Office for the Public Sector

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Workforce Information Dashboard Definitions

This page contains explanation of terms and information presented in the Workforce Information dashboard.

The dashboard should be read in conjunction with the 2017-18 Workforce Information Report.

Workforce Sectors

Data in this dashboard is aligned with Department of Treasury and Finance publications to provide a consistent presentation of the public sector in South Australia, based on each agency’s status as a budget entity.

  • ‘General Government Sector’ agencies cover the largest portion of government services and are predominantly funded by taxpayers.
  • ‘Public Non-Financial Corporations’ (PNFC) and Public Financial Corporation’ (PFC) agencies are categorised separately. PNFCs generate revenue through user charges and PFCs generally provide intermediate financial services.
  • ‘Non Budget entities’ are covered by public sector employment conditions, but have minimal or no funding tied to the State Budget.

Data may also be aligned to services provided by the ‘General Government Sector’ agencies:

  • Health
  • Education
  • General Government Services
  • Police
  • Emergency Services
  • Other Public Entity (includes all PNFC, PFC and Non Budget entities)

For more information, please refer to the 2017-18 Workforce Information Report.

 

Comparative workforce size

Comparison of workforce growth of the South Australian Public Sector relative to the growth of all other areas of the South Australian workforce relies on Labour Force data published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics in November 2018.

For more information, please refer to the 2017-18 Workforce Information Report.

 

Headcount

Persons counted in employee headcount are those paid and/or who received a salary in the last full pay period before 30 June. Due to differing pay period end dates this may vary across public sector organisations.

These include:

  • Persons on the payroll
  • Persons on leave paid in advance
  • Persons receiving workers compensation payments
  • Persons paid from funds administered by the organisation
  • Statutory appointees, eg. Commissioners
  • Casuals and persons paid on an hourly or sessional basis
  • Education Act relief and contract teachers
  • Ministerial employees and electorate secretaries
  • Vacational students
  • Employees appointed on a term or contract basis
  • Supernumerary employees employed under special recruitment schemes
  • Persons employed and paid under the federal Government’s Australian Apprenticeships Incentive Program or Career Start SA (formerly South Australian Government Youth Training Initiative), i.e.: trainees, apprentices.
  • Persons employed and paid under the SA Government Graduate Register
  • National Indigenous Cadetship Program (NICP) participants who are undertaking a 12 month temporary placement
  • Government Ministers and Members of Parliament (included under Legislature only).

Persons excluded from the calculation are:

  • Persons on leave without pay
  • Members of part time boards and committees
  • Persons working on a fee for service contract and paid on a non-time basis, eg. cleaners paid per square metre
  • Persons employed on a temporary hourly basis from external employment agencies
  • Persons working under the Work for the Dole scheme.

Full time equivalent (FTE)

The full time equivalent (FTE) of employees is the estimated number of full time personnel whose total work hours per week would be the same as that of existing full time and part time employees.

To calculate a full time equivalent, each part time employee is counted as a decimal fraction by dividing the number of hours worked each week by the normal full time hours per week for that position.

For example, in a position in which 37.5 hours each week is full time:

  • 0 hours = 0.8 FTE
  • 5 hours = 1.0 FTE

An employee cannot be expressed as more than one full time equivalent (1.0).

The FTE for casuals worked in the last pay period is calculated based on hours worked/full time hours. For the purpose of this report they are not an average but a snapshot, casuals who did not work in the last pay period are not included in this reporting. 

FTE are displayed with zero decimals (some totals may be distorted due to rounding).

Aboriginal employees

Aboriginal is intended to include both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders employees.

Those persons who are a descendant of an Australian Aboriginal, who identifies as an Aboriginal, and are recognised by members of the community in which he or she lives or has lived in.

The workforce data presented in this report is likely to under represent the true level of Aboriginal in public sector agencies due to the difficulties associated with:

  • some agencies extracting characteristics of their workforce to this level of detail from their current information systems
  • collecting data that relies on self-identification

For privacy reasons, where a selection is made comprising of fewer than 10 employees (FTE or headcount) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).

Employees with a disability

Disability is defined under Section 4 of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 as:

  • total or partial loss of the person’s bodily or mental functions; or
  • total or partial loss of a part of the body; or
  • the presence in the body of organisms causing disease or illness; or
  • the presence in the body of organisms capable of causing disease or illness; or
  • the malfunction, malformation or disfigurement of a part of the person’s body; or
  • a disorder or malfunction that results in the person learning differently from a person without the disorder or malfunction; or
  • a disorder, illness or disease that affects a person’s thought processes, perceptions of reality, emotions or judgment or that results in disturbed behaviour.

Disability requiring adaptation is defined as:

  • People with a permanent disability are those employees who, due to their disability, are considered to have an employment restriction because they:
    • are restricted in the type of work they could do
    • need modified hours of work (either a restriction in hours they could work, different time schedules, or flexible hours of attending)
    • require an employer to provide adaptive equipment, a modified work environment, or make other special work related arrangements
    • need to be given ongoing assistance or supervision to carry out their duties safely.

The workforce data presented in this report is likely to under represent the true level of disability employment in public sector agencies due to the difficulties associated with:

  • some agencies extracting characteristics of their workforce to this level of detail from their current information system
  • collecting data that relies on self-identification

In 2018, information relating to employees with a disability within South Australia Police was not available to the Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment. To allow for valid statistical analysis in this dashboard, South Australia Police have been excluded from public sector calculations of employees with a disability for this year and for all previous years. Please refer to the previous Workforce Information Reports for historical information.

Due to the way that disability data is calculated, information is only available for an agency or sector. Where a selection is made on the dashboard (such as selecting a gender from the Gender Split pie chart) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).

For privacy reasons, where a selection is made comprising of fewer than 10 employees (FTE or headcount) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).

 

Recruited

Recruited employees includes employees who were appointed to a position within a public sector organisation during a financial year. Recruitment does not include employees who have returned from leave without pay, or were already employees of an agency (i.e. either have won the position in the same agency they are already working, or have returned from contract employment in another agency).

Note that the workforce information present in this dashboard only indicates the number of employees who have started new in a public sector organisation and therefore consequently may have originated from another South Australian Public Sector organisation.

Data is intended to provide an indicator of recruitment and separation activity, not to reconcile with net changes in the active and paid FTE and headcount throughout the dashboard.

For privacy reasons, where a selection is made comprising of fewer than 10 employees (FTE or headcount) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).

Separated

Separated employees include all employees who have left a public sector agency during a financial year. Excludes all temporary appointments/assignments to other public sector agencies and those on short or long term unpaid leave.

Note, the workforce information presented in this report only indicates the number of employees who permanently separated from a public sector position and therefore consequently may have undertaken further employment in another South Australian Public Sector position.

Data is intended to provide an indicator of recruitment and separation activity, not to reconcile with net changes in the active and paid FTE and headcount throughout the dashboard.

For privacy reasons, where a selection is made comprising of fewer than 10 employees (FTE or headcount) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).

Gender

Since 2017, workforce data is captured for employees not identifying as male or female. For the purposes of this report, a new category has been titled ‘Other’, but flexibility exists for employees to identify an alternative gender with more representative terminology (typically intersex/ indeterminate/ unspecified). Collection and reporting of this data is consistent with the Australian Government Guidelines on the Recognition of Sex and Gender, November 2015

For privacy reasons, where a selection is made comprising of fewer than 10 employees (FTE or headcount) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).

Average salary

Non executives salary

Total base salary is reported. This is pre-tax income excluding superannuation and Fringe Benefit Tax (FBT).

  • non-executive employees on salary sacrifice arrangements are shown as pre-sacrifice values
  • non-financial benefits and allowances are excluded from total base salary for non-executive employees

Executives salary

Executive employees report their Total Remuneration Package Value (TRPV). This is made up of the financial benefits component plus employer superannuation contributions and motor vehicle component

The salary brackets have been constructed as an approximation to the level of responsibility, and are based on the remuneration structures of the Public Sector Act Administrative Services Stream at June of that financial year.

The salary reported is what the employee would receive if they were employed on a full time basis at their current classification, for the whole financial year, and should only be used as an indicator of responsibility level and not reflective of actual salary earnings for the financial year.

For privacy reasons, where a selection is made comprising of fewer than 10 employees (FTE or headcount) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).

Executives

Executives are defined as employees who:

Receive a total salary equivalent to $117,677 per annum or more.

or

Receives a Total Remuneration Package Value (TRPV) type contract equivalent to $147,196 per annum or more.  A total remuneration package includes monetary benefits such as salary and allowances, plus employer superannuation contributions and other non-monetary benefits such as a vehicle.

and

Has professional or managerial ‘executive’ responsibilities (and therefore not receiving a salary or TRPV in the range described above based only on additional allowances paid for specialist skills or for the purposes of attraction and retention).

or

Occupies a position having a work value of 670 points or more (using the Mercer Cullen Egan Dell assessment tool).

or

Is appointed pursuant to either Part 6 (Division 3) or Part 7 (Division 2) of the Public Sector Act 2009.

or

Is employed under the Public Sector Act in a recognised executive role, which may be any of the following classification types: EL, EX, MLS, or SAES.

A total remuneration package may include monetary benefits such as salary and allowances, plus non-monetary benefits such as the use of a vehicle and employer superannuation contribution.

This definition does not include persons with non-executive responsibilities who are paid additional allowances for specialist skills or for the purposes of attraction and retention, which take them over the financial thresholds listed above.

This employee type includes statutory appointments, managers, chief executive officers, professional specialists, medical officers, nurses and legal services officers employed at the executive level across the administrative units and other public sector organisations.

For privacy reasons, where a selection is made comprising of fewer than 10 employees (FTE or headcount) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).

Average age

For privacy reasons, where a selection is made comprising of fewer than 10 employees (FTE or headcount) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).

Average sick leave days

Average sick leave calculations includes all absences due to illness, whether paid or unpaid, and those on account of family carer’s leave. This includes:

  • Sick leave: the absence, whether paid or unpaid, resulting from an employee being too ill to work, and where the illness or injury is due to a cause which does not entitle the employee to workers’ compensation.
  • Family carer’s leave: absences on account of family leave (with or without pay).

The total number of FTE sick days over a period is calculated by converting the total number of sick days and portions of days taken over the period into hours. Once this is determined the total FTE sick days for the period can be calculated by:

  • Sum the hours of sick leave taken and divide by the normal full time hours per day of that employee type (e.g. 6.0, 7.5 or 8.0 hour working day).
  • For example, to calculate the total FTE sick days leave for 8 employees assuming that over the financial year period they took sick leave of 7.5 hours, 6.2 hours, 7.5 hours, 22.5 hours, 37.5 hours, 0.5 hours, 7.5 hours and 15.0 hours, the calculation would be:
  • Sum sick leave hours (7.5 + 6.2 + 7.5 + 22.5 + 37.5 + 0.5 + 7.5 + 15.0 = 104.2) and divide by the normal full time hours per day (7.5). This will give you the total FTE sick days for the period (=13.9).

The total number of FTE sick days for an agency is divided by the average full time equivalent (FTE) of employees in the agency (the estimated average number of full time personnel over a financial year).

The number of intervals within the period will be used to calculate the average FTE figure over the period. Generally either fortnightly or monthly intervals are used.  

Once this is determined, the average FTE figure is calculated as follows:

  • Sum of FTE at the end of each interval divided by the number of intervals, for example, to calculate the average FTE figure using monthly intervals for the period January 1 to June 30, assuming that the FTE figure for the last day of each month was 61.0 at January, 60.1 at February, 63.2 at March, 63.4 at April, 67.3 at May, 64.2 at June, the calculation would be:
  • Average FTE =61.0+ 60.1+ 63.2 + 63.4 + 67.3 + 64.2 divided by 6 (number of months) = 63.2.

Due to the way that sick leave data is collected and calculated:

  • Average sick leave information is only displayed for the period of 2016-17 and 2017-18 (where available).
  • Information is only available for an agency or the whole of public sector. Where any selection is made on the dashboard (such as filtering by sector or gender) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).
  • For privacy reasons, where a selection is made comprising of fewer than 10 employees (FTE or headcount) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).

 

Age distribution

For privacy reasons, where a selection is made comprising of fewer than 10 employees (FTE or headcount) information will not be shown in this graphic. The words ‘N/S’ will appear instead (“Not Shown”).

Appointment type

Ongoing

The employment is on an ongoing basis and does not have an end date, that is, it is considered to be ‘permanent’. This includes full time and part time employment.

Term employment

The employment is on a fixed term basis and has a clear end date. That is the date at which that particular employment contract ends is clearly stated. The appointment can be on either a short term or long term basis.

For reporting purposes, any contract appointment overrides the previous appointment type of an employee. For example, an ongoing employee who is subsequently appointed on a term basis is deemed to be contract, not ongoing.

This appointment type does not include casuals.

Persons employed on a full time and part time basis are included in this appointment type.

Note that a portion of contract employees may have a right to ongoing employment in the South Australian Public Sector at the conclusion of their current contract, and this is commonly called a tenured or substantive position.

Short term contract

The employment contract is for a period up to and including one year.

Persons who have been appointed on a number of short term contracts should be recorded as contract short term regardless of the length of time they have been with a single employer or in a single position.

For example, an employee appointed on a one year contract basis who is subsequently granted an extension or appointed on another one year contract basis is deemed to be contract short term, not contract long term or ongoing.

Long term contract

The employment contract is for a period that extends beyond one year, which is from between one to five years.

Persons who have been appointed on a number of long term contracts should be recorded as contract long term regardless of the length of time they have been with a single employer or in a single position. For example, an employee appointed on a three year contract basis who is subsequently granted an extension or appointed on another three year contract basis is deemed to be contract long term not ongoing. Chief executives must be recorded as contract long term employees.

Other

Public Sector Act and Weekly Paid casuals, Education Act relief teachers, TAFE Act hourly paid instructors, Children’s Services Act relief teachers and relief early childhood workers, and any other employees not appointed on an ongoing, short term or long term contract basis.

Casual

Casual employees are those who do not have regular or systematic hours of work.

For the purposes of public sector wide reporting the casual contract appointment type is reported under the appointment type “Other”.

Employment status

The majority of public sector employees are employed on a full time basis. Employees can also be employed on a part time basis.

The definition of part time may differ between groups of employees as a full time workload can vary from 37.5 to 38.0 to 40.0 hours per week depending on the occupation and conditions of employment.

Part time employees are therefore persons who are engaged for less than the normal full time hours per week for that occupation or position.

Casual employees are by definition recorded as part time employees.

Frontline services

Frontline services includes police, doctors, nurses, teachers and other frontline roles or direct support roles include fire fighters, ambulance officers, allied health professionals (such as physiotherapists and radiographers), school services officers, and disability workers. Other roles are considered policy or administrative.

For more information, please refer to the 2017-18 Workforce Information Report.

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